Wednesday, May 24, 2006

Boneless, Skinless



I pay the premium to buy boneless, skinless chicken breasts. My husband once remarked that people have it too easy, when you can just go and buy your food at the store, boneless skinless, and not think twice as to how it got that way. He thought people should know the whole "process" and truly appreciate it before they should be allowed that luxury.

Ok - he's a nut, but he may have a point. Now I look at all sorts of "conveniences" and wonder about the process.

And..... as I reminded him, believe me - I know the process. I've seen a field-dressed deer.... I've seen how a quail goes from "cute" to "dinner." One of my worst childhood memories is of my brother and I sitting in the garage, plucking pheasants for my Dad. It was THE WORST THING I've probably ever done. I don't know why it bothered me so much, but I cried through the whole thing. It wasn't the first time I'd seen a dead bird. I grew up around people who hunted - I understood the whole nature=food connection, and it generally didn't bother me too much.

But that....**shudder** ...maybe it was the smell, the feel of the bird..., really the whole process. But, I tell ya - it scarred me for life. I mentioned this to my dad a few years ago and, well, first he laughed... but then he apologized. He had no clue he'd scarred me for life - how horrible it was and what a vivid and gross memory it has become!

Eww - sorry 'bout that... That may have been too vivid a description of the "process" - point made. Thanks for sticking with me if you're still reading at ths point!

So - on loving and appreciating the process - as I continue to work on my "First Class Shawl" (my name), otherwise known as "Wrap Yourself In Nature" from my new Inspired Cable Knits, by Fiona Ellis - WOW - I really appreciate the fact that I can just buy the book, and someone else has gone through the process. I realize I have not truly gushed over this book properly yet. It just boggles my mind. The designs and cable patterns in this book are remarkable- true works of art.

Ms. Ellis has completely won me over. She has not only come up with beautiful and unique cable patterns, all "inspired," but she then creates the perfect garments to compliment them.... and I can't even begin to wonder how it all goes from idea, to knitted sample, to charting and patterning. I appreciate and am in awe of the process.

This book has 20 patterns, and I seriously want to make at least 10 of them. Did I tell you how much I love this book?

and, as for dinner tonight - I have NO desire to know how this got from cow to my freezer, but I'm sure I appreciate the process.

23 Comments:

At 10:14 AM, Blogger Sonya said...

As long as you know that there IS a process, you're way ahead of most people. Whenever Kevin gets hassled about being a hunter, he says, "Unless you are a strict vegan, I don't want to hear it." There aren't a lot of strict vegans around (at least not here).

I love, love, love the Fiona Ellis book too. Such creativity! I'm anxious to start seeing entries in blogland as people start knitting the patterns.

 
At 11:49 AM, Blogger Karen said...

You are on such a roll lately, one post is funnier than the next!!! I love buying skinless, boneless and am very thankful not to have to learn the process. :) I've heard such great reviews - I'm going ot have to check it out for myself. Thanks for the tip!!

 
At 12:00 PM, Blogger Chris said...

Another excellent thought-provoking post! And obviously I'm going to have to check out that book.

 
At 12:35 PM, Blogger Mom (a.k.a. Mary Ann) said...

My husband is a quasi-vegetarian. He will eat beef on occasion if it is VERY WELL DONE. (This causes me some embarassment in fine restaurants). I never buy chicken or fish for him. He eats a veggie burger on Thanksgiving. I almost never buy ground beef. We make chili and spaghetti with veggie "crumbles". They are like already browned ground beef. Talk about easy preparation. But I don't even want to think about the "process" those poor little soy beans had to go through.

 
At 1:01 PM, Anonymous Rebekah said...

Oh I agree with you that is one of the best books I've purchased in a long time, I wrote down all the patterns in it I want to make, 11 of the 20, and the other 9 I love, just not things I'd or anyone I'd knit for would use.

 
At 1:09 PM, Blogger Lynda said...

MaryAnn - You are too funny - I never thought about the poor little soy beans! We eat our share of veggie burgers, too! I actually quite like them... and a "hamburger" made with a big ol' grilled portabello mushroom instead of meat.... heavenly.

 
At 1:33 PM, Blogger Lynda said...

...and apologies to any vegetarian readers... really. I hope you come back.

 
At 1:49 PM, Blogger Jennifer said...

I keep going back and forth on wanting to get the Fiona Ellis book. It's that good, eh?

 
At 1:52 PM, Anonymous Beth said...

Ooo, I feel sick after seeing the beef photo. ;) I used to not eat any meat, but I do eat fish now. The other night my husband made ribs and I could barely sit at the table while he ate them. Something about the sound...

Can't wait to see you shawl!

 
At 2:30 PM, Anonymous heather said...

Boy, every time we sit down for dinner Lizzie's asks how the steak was made, or where pork comes from, and I hate answering. Makes me want to become a vegitarian.
Your pheasant story is so sad! Reminds me of a venison incident I had when I was a kid......

That book has been taunting me. If you say it's good it must be. I'm venturing to great yarn shop tomarrow, maybe they'll have it!

 
At 3:44 PM, Blogger JennyRaye said...

I'm on hold for the Ellis book at the library. Just wish whoever has it would turn it back in....NOW!

 
At 3:49 PM, Blogger Jen said...

for a moment there, I thought you were referring to the models used in the book's photography. Plastic-women, i say!

I try not to think about it. I had a similar experience with my grandparents. They used to raise chickens and it would always be such a happy day when they'd bring home the cardboard box of fluffy yellow chicks. I never made the connection between fluffy yellow chicks and lunch until I actually walked in on my great grandmother slaughtering one of the chickens. I still eat their cooking though, so it must not have been all that scarring...

 
At 4:32 PM, Anonymous amanda cathleen said...

Great post!! Never the less, the process is important. Same here, I have no desire to know how it got from the animal to the supermarket!

 
At 4:49 PM, Blogger KnitPastis said...

I glanced through that book a few weeks ago and you are so right...very beautiful designs in there. Can we all come for dinner? LOL

 
At 8:13 PM, Blogger Christine said...

I was laughing so hard over the whole process thing, I had to read it to my husband. The pheasant thing though ... ew. You poor thing. I can barely handle raw chicken - that might have sent me over the edge!

 
At 8:36 PM, Anonymous erin said...

Confession - I don't know how to chop up a chicken into parts. I mean I could hack at it but you won't recognise it as chicken pieces. As I am not that experienced a knitter, I completely agree with what you're saying about patterns. All the hard stuff's been done and I can be assured of something nice without having to tear my hair out.

 
At 2:12 AM, Blogger keohinani said...

i like that book. i thumb through it every time i go to the bookstore. :)

 
At 6:06 AM, Blogger mamma said...

My confession is much like Erin's. I don't know what to do with a chicken if it isn't already boneless and skinless. I am spoiled that way and very grateful.

I'm going to have to go check out that book. It sounds amazing.

 
At 10:58 AM, Blogger Holly said...

All righty then. I'm heading out to a new (to me) LYS this evening and I will be looking for this book!

 
At 1:38 PM, Anonymous Dana said...

It's spring turkey season here in NY and my dear hubby will be out this weekend to bring me home a bird- however, it come home "coookable"- aka- NO FEATHERS!!!

By the way, I was introduced to your blog by Lynne (iwasknittogetherinmymotherswomb) and I love to read your stuff!

 
At 2:45 PM, Blogger amylovie said...

The book is gorgeous. I just wish I had time to knit some of the goodies in there.

Amy

 
At 4:57 PM, Blogger sue said...

Oh how awful a memory for you. I too had to pluck a pet duck that my uncle had killed. I only pulled a few feathers off but that was enough. The image of it still is vivid in my mind. I do not think I could kill an animal or be a nurse either with all that blood. I have seen the Fiona Ellis book but not bought it yet.

 
At 6:44 PM, Blogger Lorette said...

I agree with you on the book. There are several patterns in there that I could see making.
I couldn't stomach eating chicken off the farm for years, after watching my mom and aunt butcher them in hordes every year. I would eat it shrink-wrapped out of the supermarket case, but not that fresh stuff that I had seen flop around after they chopped the heads off.

 

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